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Afghanistan risks potential T20 World Cup ban | Courtesy of: Rashid Khan | Photo credit: Twitter

Highlights

  • Status of Afghanistan men’s cricket team under Taliban remains unclear
  • Although Afghanistan is slated to feature in the 2021 T20 World Cup, it is not yet clear which flag they will play under.
  • If Afghanistan plays under the Taliban flag, they could be banned from participating in the T20 World Cup

Afghan cricket remains in a state of chaos. The Taliban’s takeover of the country’s political spectrum has changed the country’s outlook. Although the country’s men’s cricket team has been allowed to resume its cricket commitments, the identity of the team is still in question. With less than a month to go before the 2021 T20 World Cup, it remains to be seen whether the country’s men’s team will be allowed to compete under the Afghanistan flag. In a case where the team is brought in to participate under the Taliban flag, the repercussions could be enormous.

It is not yet clear how the Taliban view Afghanistan’s participation in the 2021 T20 World Cup. But the appointment of Naseeb Zadran Khan in place of Hamid Shinwari hints at the Taliban’s intention to stand out in the world. international circuit.

In accordance with the protocols, all nations participating in the T20 World Cup are expected to submit the flags under which they will participate. Usually this process is not a subject of debate, but in the case of Afghanistan it is. If Afghanistan submitted the Taliban flag for the flagship event, the International Cricket Council would be under pressure to clarify its position on the situation in the Asian country.

According to a report in the Telegraph United Kingdom, ICC could not only ban Afghanistan from participating in the T20 World Cup, but could also expel it as one of the member countries.

Afghanistan qualified directly for the 2021 T20 World Cup finals and placed in Group 2 alongside India, Pakistan and New Zealand. They will be joined by two other teams in qualifying which begins on October 17.

Afghan women are also under pressure over the current status of their national women’s team. According to ICC rules, full members must have a national women’s team. The Afghanistan Cricket Board was due to launch its women’s team this year, but the plans suffered a huge setback with Taliban infiltration into the country.

Earlier this month, the ICC admitted to being concerned about women’s cricket in Afghanistan. Australia has even threatened to overturn its historic test against the Afghan men’s team if the nation does not promote women’s cricket like other member nations.

Afghanistan, at present, receives $ 5 million per year in funding from the ICC as a full member. If 12 of the 17 board members decided to suspend Afghanistan’s membership due to the current situation, the board would be forced to do so.